Should I stay or should I go?



Being stuck in a job that isn’t working is tedious, tiresome and frustrating. The longer it goes on for, the worse it gets, and the more likely it is to harm one’s workplace performance.


If the job role itself isn’t motivating you, then this can be a real drain on your energy. It can have an adverse effect on your energy levels, your mood, as well as your sleep. Furthermore, it can cause an enduring sense of anxiety about what the future holds for you. After a while, the wrong job could have a significant effect on one’s mental health as well. In this instance, my advice would be to get yourself out of there as soon as the opportunity presents itself to you.


Sometimes, it’s not so much the job itself that’s the problem, but the work environment you find yourself in. In which case, you may want to think about making some adjustments to your work environment. This may be in the form of flexible work hours, special equipment, or changes to your duties and responsibilities. Sometimes these changes can make the world of difference. I can understand why some might feel nervous about discussing this with their employer, especially if you’re a people pleaser. But if you do love your job, then there is no reason why you shouldn’t make it work for you. If you’re good at what you do, then it’s in the employer’s best interest to do their utmost to help you perform more productively. Even if that means making some tweaks to your job description.


Are reasonable adjustments enough though?

I know from personal experience that there is way more to a job than reasonable adjustments. If the work environment is right, but the passion and drive is missing, then you aren’t going to be your best self. This is really important to understand, because without the drive, it’s impossible for one’s ADHD to thrive.


It seems that many ADHDers who are lingering in the wrong job, risk getting stuck in the status quo. Faced with the daunting anxiety of making life-changing decisions, it’s natural for many of us to want to postpone it for another day. A typical avoidance strategy that is likely to store up trouble for the future.


If you still aren’t getting what you’d like from your job, then it may be time to take a deeper look at what’s missing and start to reassess your options. It may well be that you’re in the wrong job; especially if it prevents you from expressing your authentic self. Perhaps it’s the people you work with, or the ethos of the organisation isn’t in sync with your values.


When considering your options, a thorough cost benefit analysis can be hard to complete on your own. It can help if you do this with a coach or a close friend who understands you and has your best interests at heart.